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Presented at this conference last week. Learned quite a bit about methodological and substantive aspects of int’l migration research. INED, France is doing some amazing work- check out their MAFE project, among other things.

Presented at this conference last week. Learned quite a bit about methodological and substantive aspects of int’l migration research. INED, France is doing some amazing work- check out their MAFE project, among other things.

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globalsociology:

Congressional Demographics

globalsociology:

Congressional Demographics

(via globalsociology)

Link

My sister just joined Nyaya! Couldn’t be prouder.

nyayahealth:

Bhinnata joins the Nyaya Health team as the Assistant to the Country Director. In this role, she will facilitate management of all hospital operations and in-country programs. She will also directly liaise between US and Nepal-based executive teams via communication, logistical coordination and…

(Source: achhamglobalhealth10011)

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Nepal ranks 6th on the list of the countries with the largest decline. This is great news but there is still much to achieve and many rural areas continue to face challenges. One way you can help decrease infant/child mortality is by voting for Nyaya Health on Chase Community Giving via facebook ( http://bit.ly/votefornepal). Nyaya Health provides free health services to those in need in far west Nepal, mostly women and children. With your votes, they could win $250K to expand their services to other remote parts of Nepal where the need is dire.

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explore-blog:

If women dominate higher education, why does a gender gap in workforce pay still exist? A short but smart discussion of why.

explore-blog:

If women dominate higher education, why does a gender gap in workforce pay still exist? A short but smart discussion of why.

(Source: , via halftheskymovement)

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Please vote for Nyaya Health, an organization that is very close to my heart. They save hundreds of lives every year and now you can help them save even more. And, please share about this important effort widely.

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globalsociology:

The Middle Class - Tom Toles

globalsociology:

The Middle Class - Tom Toles

(Source: globalsociology)

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doctorswithoutborders:

Interview: Fighting Neglected Diseases Among Italy’s Migrant Populations Since early 2012, more than 1,000 migrants have arrived on the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa, Sicily by boat from Libya. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is monitoring the humanitarian and medical situation and providing screening and treatment for tuberculosis and Chagas disease, two neglected diseases to which migrants are particularly vulnerable. In this interview, Dr. Silvia Garelli, MSF head of mission in Italy, discusses MSF’s activities there and the health challenges migrants face.What is MSF currently doing to help migrants in Italy? The conditions and health situation faced by migrants without papers in the centers for identification and expulsion continue to be extremely dire, and the situation has been aggravated by an extension of the detention period up to 18 months. Health services at these are subcontracted to private firms instead of being provided by the Ministry of Public Health, and a lack of effective coordination is causing problems that directly affect patients. For example, diseases such as tuberculosis that must be detected very early are poorly diagnosed and treated among migrants, despite the existence of national protocols. Outside of the centers, MSF has identified another medical need that primarily affects migrants (in this case, those from Latin America) and that is not covered by the national system at all: diagnosis and treatment of Chagas disease. Chagas is caused by a parasite transmitted to humans by the bite of insects especially prevalent in Latin America.Read the rest of the interview here.Photo: Night view of Mineo, an asylum-seeker’s village where MSF provides mental health care for migrants.  Italy 2011 © Mattia Insolera

doctorswithoutborders:

Interview: Fighting Neglected Diseases Among Italy’s Migrant Populations

Since early 2012, more than 1,000 migrants have arrived on the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa, Sicily by boat from Libya. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is monitoring the humanitarian and medical situation and providing screening and treatment for tuberculosis and Chagas disease, two neglected diseases to which migrants are particularly vulnerable. In this interview, Dr. Silvia Garelli, MSF head of mission in Italy, discusses MSF’s activities there and the health challenges migrants face.

What is MSF currently doing to help migrants in Italy?

The conditions and health situation faced by migrants without papers in the centers for identification and expulsion continue to be extremely dire, and the situation has been aggravated by an extension of the detention period up to 18 months. Health services at these are subcontracted to private firms instead of being provided by the Ministry of Public Health, and a lack of effective coordination is causing problems that directly affect patients. For example, diseases such as tuberculosis that must be detected very early are poorly diagnosed and treated among migrants, despite the existence of national protocols. Outside of the centers, MSF has identified another medical need that primarily affects migrants (in this case, those from Latin America) and that is not covered by the national system at all: diagnosis and treatment of Chagas disease. Chagas is caused by a parasite transmitted to humans by the bite of insects especially prevalent in Latin America.

Read the rest of the interview here.

Photo: Night view of Mineo, an asylum-seeker’s village where MSF provides mental health care for migrants.
Italy 2011 © Mattia Insolera

Link

A mighty powerful piece….